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  • Belfast Between The Wars

FIRE THRILL FOR BELFAST: WOMAN AT HIGH WINDOW

Londonderry Sentinel, Tuesday 8th January 1929


BROUGHT DOWN BY FIREMEN


Fire thrilled in the heart of Belfast yesterday. A woman nearly overcome and hanging limply out of a four-storey window, with smoke swirling round her, provided intense excitement for upwards of one thousand spectators.


Hurrying along Royal Avenue after lunch, pedestrians were surprised to see smoke issuing out of a window in the block of offices which constitute 133, Royal Avenue.

The alarm sounded, and the fire brigade speedily dealt with a fire which had broken out in the coal hole. Hose which had been run out for use was not required, and then spectators were astonished to see a woman waving for help from an upper window at the end of the suite of offices. Dense volumes of smoke poured out of the window, and the woman waved frantically with her scarf to keep the acrid fumes away. Anxiously the spectators, including dozens of typists from offices in Royal Avenue, watched the woman, who, as the smoke increased, leaned further out and wondered why she was not being rescued.


Eventually, after a lapse of some minutes – which seemed an age to the strained eyes of the anxious spectators – the woman was rescued by firemen and was taken down into Royal Avenue. Her name is Miss Morrow, who carries on business as a ladies’ outfitter in the offices which were involved in the fire.


For a long time after her rescue Miss Morrow was unable to speak, and eventually related that on hearing the cry of “Fire” she rushed into the caretaker’s rooms. “I was unable to get out with the smoke and I wanted them to run up the fire escape for me,” she said. “I was not frightened, but I was gasping for breath and nearly overcome.”

Miss Morrow held on grimly to her parcel of dainty apparel, and finally proceeded about her work as if nothing had happened.


Fire thrilled in the heart of Belfast yesterday. A woman nearly overcome and hanging limply out of a four-storey window, with smoke swirling round her, provided intense excitement for upwards of one thousand spectators.

Hurrying along Royal Avenue after lunch, pedestrians were surprised to see smoke issuing out of a window in the block of offices which constitute 133, Royal Avenue.

The alarm sounded, and the fire brigade speedily dealt with a fire which had broken out in the coal hole. Hose which had been run out for use was not required, and then spectators were astonished to see a woman waving for help from an upper window at the end of the suite of offices. Dense volumes of smoke poured out of the window, and the woman waved frantically with her scarf to keep the acrid fumes away. Anxiously the spectators, including dozens of typists from offices in Royal Avenue, watched the woman, who, as the smoke increased, leaned further out and wondered why she was not being rescued.

Eventually, after a lapse of some minutes – which seemed an age to the strained eyes of the anxious spectators – the woman was rescued by firemen and was taken down into Royal Avenue. Her name is Miss Morrow, who carries on business as a ladies’ outfitter in the offices which were involved in the fire.

For a long time after her rescue Miss Morrow was unable to speak, and eventually related that on hearing the cry of “Fire” she rushed into the caretaker’s rooms. “I was unable to get out with the smoke and I wanted them to run up the fire escape for me,” she said. “I was not frightened, but I was gasping for breath and nearly overcome.”

Miss Morrow held on grimly to her parcel of dainty apparel, and finally proceeded about her work as if nothing had happened.


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